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The colours below identify which house each event belongs to.

2 Willow Road
Benjamin Franklin House
Burgh House
Charles Dickens Museum
Dr Johnson's House
Emery Walker's House
Fenton House and Garden
Freud Museum
Handel & Hendrix in London
Hogarth's House
John Wesley's House
Keats House Museum
Kelmscott House
Stephens House and Gardens
22 May 2019
Talks

The Hidden Persuader

An evening of discussion, hosted by artist Emma Smith with contributions from invited guests specialising in child development, children’s rights, and psychoanalysis. This event will consider and seek to unpack some of the key themes and ideas from Smith’s exhibition, Wunderblock.

Wunderblock is an exhibition of new work by artist Emma Smith, drawing on original historical research into the post-war fascination with the infant mind. Set against a history of state interest and intervention into child development after the Second World War, and a preoccupation with the accountability of the mother, Wunderblock questions and inverts some of this complex narrative to consider the agency of the child.

In the history of childhood, the child has emerged from an un-recognised entity to a protected status of vulnerability. But where in this history has the child been acknowledged as having agency in their own right? And to what extent does the child influence the adult world, both the children around us and the child we used to be? What is the agency of the child and what structures of power / societal expectations can this sit within? Can the child’s influence be seen in relation to the feminist idea of power to transform others, rather than to have power over them?

The event will reflect on Smith’s research and that of the Hidden Persuaders Project at Birkbeck, University of London. It will also consider contemporary attitudes to the shaping of the infant mind, and encourage attendees to question and consider their own beliefs in relation to the current status of children and young people in our society.

Advance booking strongly recommended

Ticket collection and access to the exhibition between 6.15-7pm

Part of the events series for Wunderblock by Emma Smith, curated by Rachel Fleming-Mulford, and commissioned by Birkbeck, University of London for the Hidden Persuaders Project, funded by the Wellcome Trust Public Engagement Fund. 

Please click here for more details on this event

Freud Museum
29 May 2019
Talks

Freud in Prison

 

This discussion will aim to consider the connection between sexual abuse, offending behaviour and the vitality of psychotherapy.

In November 2015, George Osbourne announced the closure of the largest women’s prison in Europe, HMP Holloway. The recently published book, The End of the Sentence, Psychotherapy with Female Offenders, edited by Pamela Windham Stewart and Jessica Collier is part of the Forensic Psychotherapy Monograph Series edited by Brett Kahr. The End of the Sentence records the rich and varied therapeutic interventions provided over 25 years at HMP Holloway.

The Freud in Prison conversation continues thinking about current forensic psychotherapy described in The End of the Sentence. A key part of the discussion will explore the correlation between the high number of inmates who are victims of childhood sexual abuse (estimated at 65% of offenders have been sexually abused). The other aspect for discussion, and related to the first, is the creative power of psychotherapy in a forensic setting.

This conversation will between Pamela Windham Stewart, a psychotherapist and Kelly. While a former inmate, Kelly attended weekly psychotherapy as well as participating in weekly Managing Emotions Groups facilitated by Professor Gill McGauley and Pamela. From this experience Kelly has devised a 10-week group for women who were abused as children which she will discuss.

Can psychotherapy have a bigger, more vocal role to play in prisons and in society as a whole? Is psychotherapy a creative process which should take up a larger political role? And can we also consider what it is about child sexual abuse that is a mental prison for individuals, institutions and society at large?

…And may also have been a prison for Freud?

 

Please click here for more details on this event

Freud Museum