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The colours below identify which house each event belongs to.

2 Willow Road
Benjamin Franklin House
Burgh House
Charles Dickens Museum
Dr Johnson's House
Emery Walker's House
Fenton House and Garden
Freud Museum
Handel & Hendrix in London
Hogarth's House
John Wesley's House
Keats House Museum
Kelmscott House
Stephens House and Gardens
09 May 2019
Talks

Art on the Couch: The Creative Process of the Artist

As part of London Craft Week 2019, the Freud Museum will be inviting artists Christie Brown and Barnaby Barford to explore the creative process in the production of their work, chaired by psychoanalyst Lesley Caldwell.

Both artists have formerly exhibited their work at the Freud Museum. Christie Brown’s solo exhibition in 2012-2013 entitled DreamWork was comprised of ceramic figures that responded to Sigmund Freud’s own collection of antiquities. Barnaby Barford contributed to a major in-house exhibition in 2018, Leaving Today: the Freuds in Exile 1938, where he produced a series of artworks with young survivors living in exile in London.

London Craft Week (8-12 May 2019) is an annual event that showcases exceptional craftsmanship through a journey-of-discovery programme featuring hidden workshops and unknown makers alongside celebrated masters, famous studios, galleries, shops and luxury brands.

Click here for more details on this event

 

Freud Museum
11 May 2019
Other

PROJECTIONS: Lars von Trier's Depression Trilogy

Clinical depression is a topic Lars von Trier understands only too well, having been a sufferer for many years.

 

His films Antichrist (2009), Melancholia (2011) and Nymphomaniac (2013) together form the so-called ‘Depression Trilogy’, driven by complex female characters battling profound grief, despair, and loneliness. Von Trier relies on the creative process to work through his debilitating mental health issues, famously saying, “I’m afraid of everything in life, except filmmaking.”

 

In this intensive day-course, we will psychoanalytically interpret Lars von Trier’s Depression Trilogy, with a special focus on the 1917 essay Mourning and Melancholia, in which Sigmund Freud distinguishes between healthy and pathological responses to loss. We will engage with interdisciplinary concepts to explore von Trier’s dark and compelling emotional landscapes, where courageous performers represent the internal life of the director, shining a light through the dense fog of depression.

 

11 May, 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

 

£45 - £65

 

Click here for more details on this event.

Freud Museum
18 May 2019
Other

PROJECTIONS: Lars von Trier's America Trilogy

Lars Von Trier’s reputation precedes him; he’s been called a trickster, a troll, a provocateur, and a punk.

 

His cinema sparks debate and controversy all over the world, boldly reaching into the darkest recesses of the human soul.

 

The Danish director is fascinated by Americana, despite having never travelled to the United States due to an overwhelming fear of flying. He investigates American society in an unofficial trilogy of films comprised of Dogville (2003), Manderlay (2005) and The House That Jack Built (2019). In these uncompromising tales of revenge, slavery and serial murder, we find a unique take on the volatility of group dynamics, the discontents of civilization, and all manner of human brutality.

 

Von Trier believes that the ‘Golden Age’ of democracy is behind us; in the current Trumpian era of bombastic political posturing, we will attempt to elevate the discourse with a psychoanalytic reading of Lars’s ‘America Trilogy’.

 

18 May, 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

£45 - £65

Click here for tickets and more details on this event

 
 
Freud Museum
19 May 2019
Other

Lacan and Kafka: Knowledge, Enjoyment, and the Big Other

 

There are only three passing references to Kafka in the entirety of Lacan’s vast oeuvre.

In this one-day intensive course, we will scrutinise these passages in their context and show how they can nonetheless throw light on key aspects of Lacanian psychoanalysis.

More generally, through a comparative reading of Lacan’s Seminars and Kafka’s The Castle and The Burrow, we will introduce a number of pivotal psychoanalytic notions such as the object a, the big Other, the fantasy of absolute knowledge, and surplus-enjoyment.

The course will close with an outline of Lacan’s epistemological, ethical, and political stance in his visceral opposition to the so-called university discourse, the contemporary late-capitalist Castle.

 

19 May, 10:00 am - 5:00 pm
£48 - £65
 
Click here for more details on this event
Freud Museum
22 May 2019
Talks

The Hidden Persuader

An evening of discussion, hosted by artist Emma Smith with contributions from invited guests specialising in child development, children’s rights, and psychoanalysis. This event will consider and seek to unpack some of the key themes and ideas from Smith’s exhibition, Wunderblock.

Wunderblock is an exhibition of new work by artist Emma Smith, drawing on original historical research into the post-war fascination with the infant mind. Set against a history of state interest and intervention into child development after the Second World War, and a preoccupation with the accountability of the mother, Wunderblock questions and inverts some of this complex narrative to consider the agency of the child.

In the history of childhood, the child has emerged from an un-recognised entity to a protected status of vulnerability. But where in this history has the child been acknowledged as having agency in their own right? And to what extent does the child influence the adult world, both the children around us and the child we used to be? What is the agency of the child and what structures of power / societal expectations can this sit within? Can the child’s influence be seen in relation to the feminist idea of power to transform others, rather than to have power over them?

The event will reflect on Smith’s research and that of the Hidden Persuaders Project at Birkbeck, University of London. It will also consider contemporary attitudes to the shaping of the infant mind, and encourage attendees to question and consider their own beliefs in relation to the current status of children and young people in our society.

Advance booking strongly recommended

Ticket collection and access to the exhibition between 6.15-7pm

Part of the events series for Wunderblock by Emma Smith, curated by Rachel Fleming-Mulford, and commissioned by Birkbeck, University of London for the Hidden Persuaders Project, funded by the Wellcome Trust Public Engagement Fund. 

Please click here for more details on this event

Freud Museum
29 May 2019
Talks

Freud in Prison

 

This discussion will aim to consider the connection between sexual abuse, offending behaviour and the vitality of psychotherapy.

In November 2015, George Osbourne announced the closure of the largest women’s prison in Europe, HMP Holloway. The recently published book, The End of the Sentence, Psychotherapy with Female Offenders, edited by Pamela Windham Stewart and Jessica Collier is part of the Forensic Psychotherapy Monograph Series edited by Brett Kahr. The End of the Sentence records the rich and varied therapeutic interventions provided over 25 years at HMP Holloway.

The Freud in Prison conversation continues thinking about current forensic psychotherapy described in The End of the Sentence. A key part of the discussion will explore the correlation between the high number of inmates who are victims of childhood sexual abuse (estimated at 65% of offenders have been sexually abused). The other aspect for discussion, and related to the first, is the creative power of psychotherapy in a forensic setting.

This conversation will between Pamela Windham Stewart, a psychotherapist and Kelly. While a former inmate, Kelly attended weekly psychotherapy as well as participating in weekly Managing Emotions Groups facilitated by Professor Gill McGauley and Pamela. From this experience Kelly has devised a 10-week group for women who were abused as children which she will discuss.

Can psychotherapy have a bigger, more vocal role to play in prisons and in society as a whole? Is psychotherapy a creative process which should take up a larger political role? And can we also consider what it is about child sexual abuse that is a mental prison for individuals, institutions and society at large?

…And may also have been a prison for Freud?

 

Please click here for more details on this event

Freud Museum