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Colour key

The colours below identify which house each event belongs to.

2 Willow Road
Benjamin Franklin House
Burgh House
Charles Dickens Museum
Dr Johnson's House
Emery Walker's House
Fenton House and Garden
Freud Museum
Handel & Hendrix in London
Hogarth's House
John Wesley's House
Keats House Museum
Kelmscott House
Stephens House and Gardens
24 June 2018
Other

Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego

For the discontent of our times we propose a marathon reading of Freud’s Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego.

First published in 1921, the text raises questions about the role of the leader today, tribalism, the triumph of modern masses, and what separates the individual from his or her subjectivity and lived history.

This event will breathe fresh life into this classic text and help both readers and listeners to think about our own era in the beautiful context of Freud’s final home on the 80th anniversary of his arrival in London.

The event is free with an admission ticket to the Freud Museum. There are no tickets and audience members can come and go as they please. This is a staged reading and interactive performance.

Reading: 1pm – 4:30pm

Discussion: 4:30pm – 6pm

Freud Museum
26 June 2018
Talks

'Avoiding the Object' with artist Cornelia Parker, O.B.E.

7pm-8.30pm

This is the third in the series of talks 'On Loss and Creativity', which coincide with the exhibition Breathe by artists Fay Ballard and Judy Goldhill.

“I resurrect things that have been killed off... My work is all about the potential of materials — even when it looks like they've lost all possibilities.”

Cornelia Parker is well known for her large scale, often site-specific, installations. Her engagement with the fragility of existence and the transformation of matter is exemplified in two key works: Dark Matter, a cartoon-like reconstruction of an exploded army shed, and Heart of Darkness, the formal arrangement of charred remains from a forest fire. Through a combination of visual and verbal allusions her work triggers cultural metaphors and personal associations, which allow the viewer to witness the transformation of the most ordinary objects into something compelling and extraordinary.

In 1997 she was shortlisted for the Turner Prize and in 2010 she was elected to the Royal Academy of Arts and became an OBE. Her work is held in numerous collections worldwide including Tate, London; British Council, London; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and the Yale Center for British Art, Connecticut. She was made the UK’s official Election Artist for the 2017 General Election.

For information and booking, please click here.

Freud Museum
30 June 2018
Other

Psychoanalysis and Religion: Freud, Jung, Kristeva

Freud is famous for portraying religion as a collective neurosis of mankind.

He argued that religious beliefs give expression to wish-fulfilling illusions, serving the immature emotional needs of the child living on within the adult.

Such illusions – he sternly maintained – should be cast aside and replaced by ideas corresponding to reality – namely, the materialistic world view that emerges gradually but inescapably from the cumulative process of scientific observation.

This is one side of Freud – expressing his self-image as an ‘Enlightenment philosophe’ (in Peter Gay’s accurate phrase). But there is another side to Freud – unfortunately less widely known – for in the later works he develops a subtle and complex theory of society, in which religion plays a much more positive – even vital – role. Seen from this perspective, religion may be regarded as necessary for our psychological well-being – even for the survival of human kind.

We will explore a range of psychoanalytic interpretations of religion, examining different views of its function and significance in the lives of human beings.

More information & booking >

Freud Museum